Thomas Jefferson Quotes – Famous Quotes

Thomas Jefferson

“Well aware…that Almighty God hath created the mind free…all attempts to influence it by temporal punishments…tend only to begat habits of hypocrisy and meaness, and are a departure from the plan of the Holy Author of religion, who being Lord both of body and mind, yet chose not to propagate it by coercions on either, as was in his Almighty power to do, but to extend it by its influence on reason alone.”

Thomas Jefferson – Article of Religious Freedom

Love Quotes

 
Nothing can occur beyond the strength of faith to sustain, or, transcending the resources of religion, to relieve.
 – Binney
 
There is no disguise which can hide love for long where it exists, or simulate it where it does not.
 – La Rochefoucauld
 
 
A very small degree of hope is sufficient to cause the birth of love.
 – Stendhal

Quotes – Famous Quotes – Eric Hoffer Quotes

The basic test of freedom is perhaps less in what we are free to do than in what we are free not to do.
– Eric Hoffer

An empty head is not really empty; it is stuffed with rubbish. Hence the difficulty of forcing anything in to an empty head.
– Eric Hoffer

The opposite of the religious fanatic is not the fanatical atheist but the gentle cynic who cares not whether there is a god or not.
– Eric Hoffer

To know a person’s religion we need not listen to his profession of faith but must find his brand of intolerance.
– Eric Hoffer

People unfit for freedom – who cannot do much with it – are hungry for power. The desire for freedom is an attribute of a “have” type of self. It says: leave me alone and I shall grow, learn, and realize my capacities. The desire for power is basically an attribute of a “have not” type of self.
– Eric Hoffer

It is not love of self but hatred of self which is at the root of the troubles that afflict our world.
– Eric Hoffer

Take man’s most fantastic invention – God. Man invents God in the image of his longings, in the image of what he wants to be, then proceeds to imitate that image, vie with it, and strive to overcome it.
– Eric Hoffer

Famous Quotes- A Good Sermon

The secret of a good sermon is to have a good beginning and a good ending; and to have the two as close together as possible.
— George Burns

Quotes – Famous Quotes – Buddha Quotes

Do not believe in anything simply because you have heard it.
Do not believe in anything simply because it is spoken and rumoured by many.
Do not believe in anything simply because it is found written in your religious books.
Do not believe in anything merely on the authority of your teachers and elders.
Do not believe in traditions because they have been handed down for many generations.
But after observation and analysis, when you find that anything agrees with reason and is conducive to the good and benefit of one and all, then accept it and live up to it.
– Buddha

Quote – Famous Quotes – Bible Quotes

What is faith? It is the confident assurance that what we hope for is going to happen. It is the evidence of things we cannot yet see.
–   Bible – St.Paul – 1 Corinthians 13

Pope Benedict XVI Remarks in Germany

The remarks by Pope Benedict XVI that are causing such controversy are below.  There is also a link to the entire speech for those who want to see the entire original in context. 

Basically “spreading the faith through violence is something unreasonable. Violence is incompatible with the nature of God and the nature of the soul.”

Pope Benedict XVI

I was reminded of all this recently, when I read the edition by Professor Theodore Khoury (Münster) of part of the dialogue carried on – perhaps in 1391 in the winter barracks near Ankara – by the erudite Byzantine emperor Manuel II Paleologus and an educated Persian on the subject of Christianity and Islam, and the truth of both. It was presumably the emperor himself who set down this dialogue, during the siege of Constantinople between 1394 and 1402; and this would explain why his arguments are given in greater detail than those of his Persian interlocutor. The dialogue ranges widely over the structures of faith contained in the Bible and in the Qur’an, and deals especially with the image of God and of man, while necessarily returning repeatedly to the relationship between – as they were called – three “Laws” or “rules of life”: the Old Testament, the New Testament and the Qur’an. It is not my intention to discuss this question in the present lecture; here I would like to discuss only one point – itself rather marginal to the dialogue as a whole – which, in the context of the issue of “faith and reason”, I found interesting and which can serve as the starting-point for my reflections on this issue.
In the seventh conversation (*4V8,>4H – controversy) edited by Professor Khoury, the emperor touches on the theme of the holy war. The emperor must have known that surah 2, 256 reads: “There is no compulsion in religion”. According to the experts, this is one of the suras of the early period, when Mohammed was still powerless and under threat. But naturally the emperor also knew the instructions, developed later and recorded in the Qur’an, concerning holy war. Without descending to details, such as the difference in treatment accorded to those who have the “Book” and the “infidels”, he addresses his interlocutor with a startling brusqueness on the central question about the relationship between religion and violence in general, saying: “Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached”. The emperor, after having expressed himself so forcefully, goes on to explain in detail the reasons why spreading the faith through violence is something unreasonable. Violence is incompatible with the nature of God and the nature of the soul. “God”, he says, “is not pleased by blood – and not acting reasonably (F×< 8`(T) is contrary to God’s nature. Faith is born of the soul, not the body. Whoever would lead someone to faith needs the ability to speak well and to reason properly, without violence and threats… To convince a reasonable soul, one does not need a strong arm, or weapons of any kind, or any other means of threatening a person with death…”.

The decisive statement in this argument against violent conversion is this: not to act in accordance with reason is contrary to God’s nature. The editor, Theodore Khoury, observes: For the emperor, as a Byzantine shaped by Greek philosophy, this statement is self-evident. But for Muslim teaching, God is absolutely transcendent. His will is not bound up with any of our categories, even that of rationality. Here Khoury quotes a work of the noted French Islamist R. Arnaldez, who points out that Ibn Hazn went so far as to state that God is not bound even by his own word, and that nothing would oblige him to reveal the truth to us. Were it God’s will, we would even have to practise idolatry.
– Pope Benedict XVI from APOSTOLIC JOURNEY OF HIS HOLINESS BENEDICT XVI TO MÜNCHEN, ALTÖTTING AND REGENSBURG (SEPTEMBER 9-14, 2006)
MEETING WITH THE REPRESENTATIVES OF SCIENCE – LECTURE OF THE HOLY FATHER – Aula Magna of the University of Regensburg – Tuesday, 12 September 2006 “Faith, Reason and the University Memories and Reflections”

 
Entire Speech